SHVA https://shvaleadership.com SHVA Leadership Fri, 17 Jul 2020 13:04:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://shvaleadership.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/cropped-LOGO-DESIGN-SHVA-Leadership-Advisersedit-32x32.jpg SHVA https://shvaleadership.com 32 32 Overcome Crisis in 5 Steps When the Leader PRAYS https://shvaleadership.com/2020/07/17/overcome-crisis-in-5-steps-when-the-leader-prays/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/07/17/overcome-crisis-in-5-steps-when-the-leader-prays/#comments Fri, 17 Jul 2020 13:02:07 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=19282 Overcome Crisis in 5 Steps When the Leader PRAYS   While the crisis is inevitable, failure, more often than not, is avoidable. Strictly speaking, Christian leaders should aim for success. God wants us to succeed and weather the storms of life, rather than merely making it by the “skin of our teeth,” as my grandmother […]

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Overcome Crisis in 5 Steps When the Leader PRAYS

 

While the crisis is inevitable, failure, more often than not, is avoidable. Strictly speaking, Christian leaders should aim for success. God wants us to succeed and weather the storms of life, rather than merely making it by the “skin of our teeth,” as my grandmother used to say. Even more so, Christian leaders have to act in the manner that Christ would have us perform, and by so doing, we move His kingdom forward by improving ours.

As an executive, leadership, and career coach, I have the privilege of speaking with and learning from the great leaders in today’s world. Overwhelming, they express fear for the future. Now, we know as Christians, that “God hath not given us the spirit of fear, but of power, love and self-discipline” (2 Tim. 1:7). But how do I, as a Christian leader, demonstrate, live, and lead by that power, love, and self-discipline, when I see constant fear, death, hate, and destruction? I submit that you, the five steps to overcome any crisis, will become apparent as the leader PRAYS.

P – Focus on the People

R – Research all the issues, not just the appealing ones

A – Be accepting, not prejudicial

Y – Be a Yucca to those in need

S – Lead by Spiritual Savvy

 

People

 

The leader-follower relationship is essential to success. In today’s world, perception is king. In our social media world, we are bombarded with a never-ending flood of leader indiscretions instantly condemned by the masses, with leader ostracization following. Followers are not immune to the virus of social media judgment and condemnation. Sadly, social media does not forget the incident, even after rectification. Once earned, leaders must employ vast resources and time to maintain the relationship they have with followers and keeping the social media perception great. In a study conducted in 2006, four basic types of leader-follower relationships emerged: Authority-based, Collaborative, Partnership, and Engaged.

 

Authority-Based Relationship

Authority-based relationships are set in place by organizational structures. Supervisors have employees assigned to them, and an authority-based relationship emerges. Strikingly by default, this relationship level does not grow loyalty. Additionally, this relationship will not motivate followers to achieve more than the minimum required to maintain employment.

 

Collaborative Relationship

The leader and follower work together to accomplish set goals in a collaborative relationship. Here, leaders and followers communicate openly with each other. To reach this relationship level, the leader must exhibit high job competence, which garners follower loyalty, trust, and respect. As trust and respect grow, partnership forms.

 

Partnership Relationship

In this relationship, the leader values the follower’s opinions and shows trust in the follower by allowing more job independence. Because both the leader and follower exhibit faith in each other’s work and abilities, the follower perceives equality with the leader. Interestingly, in this relationship, both leader and follower willingly accept they need the other to reach success.

 

Engaged Relationship

The engaged relationship is the highest form of relationship and impacts your ability to overcome crisis immensely. When engaged, both followers and leaders share information frequently. Additionally, all are highly devoted and committed to goal accomplishment because it benefits the other party. Both leader and follower look out for each other’s best interests. At this level, the leader provides clear expectations and encourages the follower toward advancement opportunities. In return, the follower actively seeks guidance and direction from the leader to meet goals.

Animosity disappears because followers and leaders genuinely care for and actively work towards the other’s best interests. Interestingly, Jesus taught his followers to reach this relationship level in the Golden Rule (Luke 6:31). To achieve this relationship level, leaders must demonstrate high job competence, trust in the follower, and genuinely care for the follower. During a crisis, the loyalty and trust levels directly correlate to survivability.

As a tremendous Biblical example, Joseph of Egypt followed the Lord because the Lord was caring, trustworthy, and competent (Deuteronomy 28:1). Consequently, by following the Lord’s teachings, Joseph learned these traits. Joseph was “well-favored” (Genesis 39:6) as a slave in with Potiphar’s house. Subsequently, due to his trust and competence, Potiphar promoted Joseph to the master of the house (Genesis 39:6). Potiphar and Joseph eventually reached the Engaged relationship level. Potiphar promoted Joseph to the highest standing allowable, trusting him so much that he knew nothing about the running of the home except the food he ate (Genesis 39:6). Eventually, Joseph became like a Prime Minister, all the while growing engaging relationships.

 

Research

For the leader to exhibit competence, the leader must conduct research. Specifically, the leader must know all that is available regarding the task or crisis at hand. The adage of knowledge being power is correct. Jesus was the embodiment of all knowledge and wisdom (Col. 2:2-3). Complete research allows making well-informed, not rushed decisions. Followers count on leaders to make the right and best choices to navigate and overcome the crisis. Too often, though, we tend to gravitate to the opinions and viewpoints most similar to our own.

 

Viewpoints

A study conducted in 2016 by Aidan Gregg at the University of Southampton discovered that people tend to first seek out others with similar viewpoints. By doing this, we solidify our position on the topic. Interestingly, we also shut out or turn off opposing views faster once we have our opinions pinned down and validated by a second person. As a leader, we cannot afford to take this destructive path. Once the leader makes the decision, all must live with its consequences. If the leader pushes a hidden agenda, other than the stated, specific goal, followers lose interest and become disenfranchised.

 

Seek Opposing Views First

To overcome this obstacle and make well-informed choices, the leader must research and learn about all viewpoints and facts. Partisan news sources often portray events through a skewed lens. Sadly, we may be past the point of having any news outlets that are truly unbiased and have no hidden agenda. Therefore, the leader must search and dig deep to uncover the impartial truth, starting with your opposing view’s news stories. Once discovered, I often recommend that leaders determine who those in the group usually play Devil’s Advocate, or most often voices discontent and ask them their thoughts and opinions before seeking those who hold similar views as yours. Taking this opposite route strengthens your ability to listen to and accept guidance and enlightenment from alternative viewpoints and often brings to light alternative ways to overcome crisis and challenges.

 

Accepting

 

On face value, most of us would quickly shout that they are accepting and in no way exercise prejudice. However, upon further review, we may be found wanting. As mentioned previously, we tend to gravitate to those with similar viewpoints. By so doing, we become more prejudicial. For this article, prejudice, which is typically associated with racial bias, more clearly describes a snap judgment we make before gaining all the information. A classic example of this type of prejudice comes from Jane Austin’s Pride & Prejudice novel. Due to pride, Darcy prejudged Elizabeth due to her social standing, and Elizabeth did the same to him based solely on a bad first impression. Indeed, we tend to prejudge books and people by their covers, ignoring the wealth of information inside.

 

Patience and Learning Overcome Prejudice

Elizabeth’s and Darcy’s problems could have been averted through a little education and patience. Similarly, leaders cause more problems than create solutions when they make prejudicial decisions based on little evidence and a desire to be the first to correct the problem. Leaders overcome this issue faster when they work to build that engaged relationship I discussed earlier. As the leader learns more about the follower, similarities will emerge. Those similarities provide an opportunity to grow closer through shared humanity and experiences. Simply put, when the leader views the follower as a child of God and a fellow brother or sister trying to make it through this life as they are, acceptance and patience increase.

 

Yucca to Those in Need

I love Yucca shrubs and trees. Some of my fondest memories of childhood come from spending summer with my grandfather near San Antonio, TX. In the back of the home was a swimming pool, and near that pool stood a tall, beautiful yucca with bright white flowers. I loved sitting nearby watching the moths and insects pollinate and scurry up and down its leaves and trunk. Through the yucca, God provided us with beautiful examples of excellent leadership. By way of disclaimer, by sharing the following examples, I am in no way purporting to be a yucca expert!

 

Specialized

Yucca trees and shrubs have specialized, symbiotic relationship with most yucca moth species. Yucca moths pollinate the flowers while simultaneously laying eggs in the flower. When the larvae develop, they feed on the yucca seeds but are very careful to leave enough seeds for future yucca species survival. They have a genuinely engaging relationship in which they both look out for the interest of the other and overcome crisis together.

 

Useful

Many parts, if not all, of yucca, are beneficial for many uses. One variety has the nickname ‘soaptree’ because the roots are used to make shampoo. Dried yucca leaves have a low burning temperature, which make them excellent fire starters. Additionally, some species are termed ‘meat hangers’ because locals used the sturdy, pointy, sharp leaves to hang meat on for drying or salting. Interestingly, the sharp, pointy leaves also prevent other animal predators from removing the drying meat prematurely. Lastly, the fibers in the leaves, because of their durability, were widely used to create ropes. To overcome crisis effectively, great leaders must be as resourceful and useful as the yucca to empower, protect, and lift those suffering during a crisis.

 

Spiritually Savvy Leadership

 

Leaders make mistakes. However, Christian leaders have a mandate to model good works, be of sound speech, and demonstrate integrity (Titus 2:7-8). Some have misinterpreted this to mean that leaders should overlook the misdeeds of high performers. Leaders must exhibit sound ethical decisions as well, so we should not ignore transgressions. Typically, savvy is associated with being shrewd; however, this has a negative connotation, often perceived as being deceitful. Follower trust will not develop at the desired rate if they see you as insincere. What savvy are we going for here? Leaders should be spiritually savvy. A study published in the Academy of Management Journal in 2018 outlined the case for spiritual savvy.

Spiritually savvy leaders have the required skills and abilities to reach success in the global economy. Specifically, empirical data suggests that spiritually in-tune leaders display mastery for exhibiting the core leadership principles of acceptance, innovation, and trust. Additionally, spiritually savvy leaders typically garner higher numbers of inspired ideas from their followers. The driving factor behind the data highlighted that spiritually savvy leaders do not set their goals based on increasing profits or reducing costs. Conversely, the spiritually savvy leaders set goals to reach perfection, fulfillment, advance knowledge, and aid others in achieving their goals. Amazingly, according to the study, once the leader’s goals shifted to those of a more spiritual nature, higher profits, lower turnover, and higher follower trust emerged than those whose focus was solely based on profit.

 

Conclusion

 

Christian leaders should aim for success during any crisis. Because we see a constant stream of fear, destruction, disaster, and sadness, leaders must exercise more leadership wisdom to compensate for the continued drag on our emotions. By continuously focusing on people and building those engaged relationships, leaders build follower trust because the follower and leader look out for each other’s best interests.

As leaders research all the issues and gain a complete picture and understanding, the leader is in a better place to make sensible decisions. When leaders demonstrate acceptance, not prejudice, for opposing viewpoints, they increase in patience, and the leader-follower relationship encourages more exceptional shared experiences. Additionally, through building a symbiotic Yucca-like relationship with your followers, you empower, protect, and lift those suffering during a crisis. This relationship enables you to look beyond the near-term and set goals for perfection by exercising spiritual savvy. Simply put, the five steps to overcome any crisis become apparent when the leader PRAYS.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

For curiosity regarding the Efficient Reading Course, go to SHVA’s Career Coaching page to learn more and register for the class!

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

 

Additional Reading

For more information on overcoming crisis, you may want to check out the following articles and book reviews:

Leader Personality Improves Productivity

Constructive Disagreement

Lead Like Jesus – Revisited

Introduction to Organizational Culture

Balancing Individual and Organizational Values: Walking the Tightrope to Success

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Leader Personality Improves Productivity https://shvaleadership.com/2020/05/25/leader-personality-improves-productivity/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/05/25/leader-personality-improves-productivity/#respond Mon, 25 May 2020 14:50:40 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=14528 This article is number 2 in our new Improve Productivity series. Article 1 is 3 Communication Practices to Escape Productivity TAR Leader Personality Improves Productivity An executive client asked a great question this week regarding his impact on corporate culture and employee productivity. After his question, I recalled a previous consulting contract, where I assisted […]

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This article is number 2 in our new Improve Productivity series. Article 1 is 3 Communication Practices to Escape Productivity TAR

Leader Personality Improves Productivity

An executive client asked a great question this week regarding his impact on corporate culture and employee productivity. After his question, I recalled a previous consulting contract, where I assisted a client in bringing on a new executive to a family-run business. Specifically, the impact the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) has on corporate culture and employee productivity.

 

CEO Personality

Interestingly, studies suggest CEO personality traits impact culture and productivity more than their personal and corporate values do, as indicated by Hultman and Gellerman (Giberson et al., 2009). Specifically, they noted CEO emotional stability and agreeableness were closely related and positively impacted the employee’s view of the Clan culture and negatively impacted the opinion of the Market and Adhocracy cultures (Giberson et al., 2009). For a brief explanation and overview of the Competing Values Framework (CVF) and descriptions of corporate culture types, please refer to my introductory article covering the CFV. Additionally, high agreeableness fosters cultures built on cohesion and increasing morale  (Giberson et al., 2009). While low agreeableness promotes performance and competitiveness (Giberson et al., 2009). The CEO’s personality traits should be a driving consideration for selection.

 

Smart Selection

Selecting the right CEO supports organizational culture change. In practice, this requires the board or business owner to choose the desired culture and then locate a CEO with the personality traits necessary to foster that culture change. In Vietnam, hospitals actively use the Organization Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) to determine the desired culture and select the new CEO to match that culture (Nguyen et al., 2018). This selection process lowered CEO turnover and increased employee satisfaction as well as hastened desired culture change (Nguyen et al., 2018). Additionally, determining the prospective CEO’s communication pattern provides insight into the preferred culture (Abugre, 2013). Perhaps most interestingly to me, selecting a CEO based on the desired corporate culture may shorten acclimation time instead of choosing a CEO and hoping they acclimate the organization.

 

Conclusion

By taking the simple steps of choosing the desired culture based on the OCAI, then selecting a CEO with personality traits matching the OCAI results does wonders for organizational culture and employee productivity improvement. The same is also true if you are a first-line supervisor seeking new ways to improve your team. I suggest you take the OCAI to determine how your personality traits match up to the culture your group prefers. Once identified, you can work on changing some of your personality traits to better foster cultural and productivity improvement. If you would like to take the first step, contact SHVA leadership either by selecting one of our pre-designed leadership development packages or emailing us at info@shvaleadership.com.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

For curiosity regarding the Efficient Reading Course, go to SHVA’s Career Coaching page to learn more and register for the class!

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

Additional Reading

For more information on organizational culture, its impacts, and how to change it, we recommend the following books:

Balancing Individual and Organizational Values: Walking the Tightrope to Success

Organizational Culture and Leadership

Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture – Based on the Competing Values Framework 3rd Ed

References

Abugre, J. B. (2013). Current and Desired Employee Communication Patterns in Sub-Saharan Africa: Empirical Evidence on Four Ghanaian Organizations. Journal of African business, 33-46.

Giberson, T. R., Resick, C. J., Dickson, M. W., Mitchelson, J. K., Randall, K. R., & Clark, M. A. (2009). Leadership and organizational culture: Linking CEO characteristics to cultural values. Journal of Business and Psychology, 123-137.

Nguyen, H. V., Nguyen, A. T., Nguyen, T. T., Nguyen, H. T., Bui, H. T., Tran, P. T., & Nguyen, A. L. (2018). Individual and occupational differences in perceived organisational culture of a central hospital in vietnam. BioMed Research International.

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Introduction to Organizational Culture https://shvaleadership.com/2020/05/25/introduction-to-organizational-culture/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/05/25/introduction-to-organizational-culture/#respond Mon, 25 May 2020 14:29:24 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=14523 Introduction to Organizational Culture   Wittingly or unwittingly, your company adopted a corporate culture. To improve employee communications, organizational innovation, and streamline operations, getting familiar with and moving your company towards your desired corporate culture, aids in productivity and employee morale improvements. This article provides a brief overview of organizational culture and some of the […]

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Introduction to Organizational Culture

 

Wittingly or unwittingly, your company adopted a corporate culture. To improve employee communications, organizational innovation, and streamline operations, getting familiar with and moving your company towards your desired corporate culture, aids in productivity and employee morale improvements. This article provides a brief overview of organizational culture and some of the benefits associated with moving your culture to the one best for your organization.

 

Competing Values Framework

 

The Competing Values Framework (CVF) can help managers remain relevant during trying and difficult times. The CVF developed in the 1980s, along with new research, aids managers in changing behaviors that promote employee innovation, communication, and engagement. Despite its age, the CVF retained its prominence in cultural theories and served as the backbone for various cultural and ideological surveys and assessments. Currently, evaluations based on the CVF are used by law enforcement, managerial, and business schools, as well as academia. Therefore, using the CVF will allow your organization to develop new ways of doing business that will move the company into a prosperous future.

Researchers developed the CVF by conducting extensive research on highly-effective organizations. Today, the CVF consists of two dimensions or areas of importance and focus, which are made up of four quadrants (cultures). One dimension focuses on discernibility, flexibility, dynamism, order, stability, and control. While the other dimension focuses on unity, orientation, rivalry, and differentiation, each of the four quadrants from distinct cultures, both forming the whole. Figure 1 illustrates the CVF displayed graphically.

 

CVF1

Figure 1 – Competing Values Framework as adapted from OCAI-online.com

The four quadrants represent competing, and often opposite, ideals and characteristics. The upper left is the clan quadrant and represents fluid yet internal corporate focus while the lower right quadrant, the Market, represents a more controlling, external focus. The upper right is the adhocracy quadrant and identifies a fluid yet external corporate focus while the lower left quadrant, the Hierarchy, represents a more controlling, internal focus. In a nutshell, these four quadrants can be thought of as culture types.

 

Four Major Culture Types

 

To get a better idea of where we want to go, we must know our starting point. When using the CVF, there are four basic, over-arching, cultural types that all organizations espouse. No organization is strictly one culture. Simply, the purpose of the culture types is to give managers and leaders an idea of what is happening and provide a roadmap to the skills and abilities they need for the preferred future. The four major culture types are:

 

  1. The Hierarchy – A Control culture
  2. The Market – A Compete culture
  3. The Clan – A Collaborative culture
  4. The Adhocracy – A Creating culture

 

No single culture type is superior to another. Each of the cultures brings different values and actions to the table to bear fruit. However, some organizations favor one or two culture types more than others. Let’s briefly review the four cultures. Figure 2 is a synopsis of each of the culture types and the relation they have to each other.

 

The Hierarchy

The Hierarchy culture focuses on creating a bureaucracy to make the organization stable and efficient. Hierarchies tend to have well-defined management structures and focus on stability, efficiency, and predictability. When this culture dominates, specific rules govern behaviors, and deviation is discouraged.

 

The Market

Unlike the Hierarchy, the Market focuses on productivity through external controls. Profitability, competitive dynamics, and conducting transactions with external constituents governs the Market. Typically, these organizations emphasize customer service, improved competitiveness, and a commitment to beat the competition. When this culture dominates, production and profitability govern behaviors, and losing is discouraged.

 

The Clan

The Hierarchy culture focuses on collaboration, a family-type environment, and teamwork (Cameron & Quinn, 2011, pg. 46). Employee development, cooperation, looking to the customer as a partner, and team-based goals govern the Clan. Instead of focusing on rules, the Clan forms quality circles to brainstorm and develop better ways of doing things. When this culture dominates, teamwork, and corporate concerns for the employees govern behaviors, and low commitment is discouraged.

 

The Adhocracy

As the name implies, this culture is defined by temporary innovations, jumping from one new product or service to the next. Flexibility and creativity guide decisions. Here, there are no hierarchical levels because power is given to each employee, depending on the assigned project and expertise things. When this culture dominates, risk-taking, and individuality reign, and the status quo is discouraged.

 

CVF Matrix

Figure 2 – Competing Values Framework as adapted from artstrategies.org

 

Culture must be carefully integrated because it impacts many business-related functions. historically, culture affects employee willingness to adapt and change, how well or not people work together, and leaders’ decision-making styles. Therefore, as your organization prepares to move into the next phase of its growth, strengthening the company culture will and aid in improving employee morale, fostering innovation, and fostering resilience.

 

To take the first step in maximizing your organization’s morale and productivity, select one of SHVA Leadership’s pre-designed leadership development packages or contact us at info@shvaleadership.com to work with us to get a custom package to meet your needs.

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

For curiosity regarding the Efficient Reading Course, go to SHVA’s Career Coaching page to learn more and register for the class!

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

 

References

Cameron, K. S., & Quinn, R. E. (2011). Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture: Based on the Competing Values Framework. San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Groysberg, B., Lee, J., Price, J., & Cheng, J. Y.-J. (2018, February). The Leader’s Guide to Corporate Culture. Retrieved from Harvard Business Review.

Hultman, K., & Gellermann, B. (2002). Balancing Individual and Organizational Values: Walking the Tightrope to Success. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.

 

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Increase Employee Engagement: Jesus or Darth Vader? https://shvaleadership.com/2020/05/02/increase-employee-engagement-jesus-or-darth-vader/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/05/02/increase-employee-engagement-jesus-or-darth-vader/#respond Sat, 02 May 2020 16:41:43 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=12297 Increase Employee Engagement: Jesus or Darth Vader?   Recently, a client contacted SHVA lamenting he felt as though he, as the workplace supervisor, was required to have all the answers and that his employees only had to be there and do as he directed. Consequently, he knew he did not have the answers and wanted […]

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Increase Employee Engagement: Jesus or Darth Vader?

 

Recently, a client contacted SHVA lamenting he felt as though he, as the workplace supervisor, was required to have all the answers and that his employees only had to be there and do as he directed. Consequently, he knew he did not have the answers and wanted SHVA to help him increase employee engagement.  His call brought me back to a previous supervisor. She was young and inexperienced when she was my supervisor. I recall several staff meetings when she openly rejected excellent advice and, during one session, even dismissed an employee because he publicly disagreed with her. Interestingly about a year later, she confided in me. She thought she had to rule with an “iron fist” and have all the answers to win employee respect. Time, experience, and wisdom helped her express regret for those choices.

 

Love and Fear

 

I routinely tell employees that supervisors can lead like Jesus or Darth Vader. Both leaders garnered a massive following. However, which had more long-lasting results? If you are looking for short-term success with an expensive long-term cost, leading by fear works. However, if the leader is looking for long-term success, fear will not work. Darth Vader did not solicit follower input and handed out swift and severe punishment at the slightest hint of failure. Conversely, Jesus valued follower ideas and earned the respect of his followers. Interestingly, it was suggested that a healthy dose of love and anxiety in the workplace inspires followers to be more engaged (Dahm & Greenbaum, 2019). The fear Dahm suggested was the fear of failure out of respect for the leader, not fear of death, as in Darth Vader’s followers.

 

Follower Dissent

 

One aspect of followership dissent I have personal experience with deals with employees in virtual working environments. Blair and Bligh (2018) posit employees in high power situations (supervisors are physically far away) are more apt to voice dissent than employees in low power (supervisors are physically nearby) situations (Blair & Bligh, 2018). My employees feel free to express disagreement with me because they are in another state. Conversely, when we have quarterly, in-office meetings, dissent is rarely voiced. Additionally, these actions support other findings that employees express dissent at higher rates via Twitter than in person (Conway et al., 2019). For more information, please see my article on Constructive Disagreement.

 

So, must leaders have all the answers? No, not at all. Simply put, to increase employee engagement, leaders must earn the follower’s respect by doing two simple acts. First, by showing love (the leader cares for and values the follower’s ideas). And second, by leveraging that love to build respect, so the follower respects the leader to such an extent that failure is not an option.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

For those of you searching for general life coaching, SHVA offers general Life Coaching now!

 

Bibliography

Blair, B. A., & Bligh, M. C. (2018). Looking for Leadership in All the Wrong Places: The Impact of Culture on Proactive Followership and Follower Dissent. Journal of Social Issues, 129-143.

Conway, E., Rosati, P., Monks, K., & Lynn, T. (2019). Voicing job satisfaction and dissatisfaction through Twitter: employees’ use of cyberspace. New Technology, Work and Employment, 139-156.

Dahm, P. C., & Greenbaum, B. E. (2019). Leadership through love and fear: an effective combination. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 326-338.

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3 Benefits of Workplace Forgiveness https://shvaleadership.com/2020/04/17/3-benefits-of-workplace-forgiveness/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/04/17/3-benefits-of-workplace-forgiveness/#respond Fri, 17 Apr 2020 13:27:05 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=11049 3 Benefits of Workplace Forgiveness   Workplace forgiveness is a must. Some leaders I know view forgiveness as a liability. Forgiving others provides many benefits. I will raise three benefits in promoting a forgiving organizational culture. Workplace forgiveness inspires innovation, promotes positive behaviors, and suppresses bad behaviors.   Inspires Innovation   Kim, Kim, and Jung […]

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3 Benefits of Workplace Forgiveness

 

Workplace forgiveness is a must. Some leaders I know view forgiveness as a liability. Forgiving others provides many benefits. I will raise three benefits in promoting a forgiving organizational culture. Workplace forgiveness inspires innovation, promotes positive behaviors, and suppresses bad behaviors.

 

Inspires Innovation

 

Kim, Kim, and Jung (2018) found when employees forgive each other; they are less fearful of competition and more likely to communicate innovative ideas (Kim, Kim, & Jung, 2018). Additionally, innovative behavior in business is a requirement to maintain relevance (Pisano, 2019). As business leaders promote workplace forgiveness among employees, they inspire innovation, and the company remains relevant.

 

Increase Positive Behavior/Decrease Negative

 

Workplace forgiveness engenders positive social behavior and suppresses anti-social behaviors. Zdaniuk and Bobocel (2015) determined when leaders promote forgiveness and mediate a collective employee identity, employees contained anti-social behaviors, namely avoidance, and revenge, instead of relying on supervisors (Zdaniuk & Bobocel, 2015). Conversely, when leaders promoted workplace forgiveness, they found employees reacted in positive ways to workplace mistreatment of themselves and other employees (Zdaniuk & Bobocel, 2015). Responding favorably to perceived workplace injustice is badly needed in today’s social media environment.

 

Workplace Forgiveness Must Have Accountability

 

Christians are commanded to forgive. However, while the Bible commands us to forgive (Luke 6:7, King James Version), we must also hold offenders to some accountability (Romans 14:12). Radulovic, Thomas, Epitropaki, and Legood (2019) indicate organizations that foster workplace forgiveness but do not maintain some level of responsibility and accountability actually foster adverse effects, such as violence and laziness (Radulovic, Thomas, Epitropaki, & Legood, 2019). Therefore, leaders must be mindful of the positive and possible adverse effects of workplace forgiveness to ensure the organization maximizes its return on the forgiveness investment.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

For those of you searching for general life coaching, SHVA offers general Life Coaching now!

 

References

Kim, B.-J., Kim, T.-H., & Jung, S.-Y. (2018). How to Enhance Sustainability through Transformational Leadership: The Important Role of Employees’ Forgiveness. Sustainability, 1-13.

Pisano, G. P. (2019). The Hard Truth About Innovative Cultures. The Harvard Business Review, 62–71.

Radulovic, A. B., Thomas, G., Epitropaki, O., & Legood, A. (2019). Forgiveness in leader–member exchange relationships: Mediating and moderating mechanisms. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 498-534.

Zdaniuk, A., & Bobocel, D. R. (2015). The role of idealized influence leadership in promoting workplace forgiveness. The Leadership Quarterly, 863-877.

 

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3 Ways Leaders Generate Social Media Influence via CTR https://shvaleadership.com/2020/04/11/3-ways-leaders-generate-social-media-influence-via-ctr/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/04/11/3-ways-leaders-generate-social-media-influence-via-ctr/#respond Fri, 10 Apr 2020 23:32:15 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=10427 3 Ways Leaders Generate Social Media Influence via CTR   Social media influence can make or break a leader and an entire organization. Too often, nightly news is bombarded with articles of leaders posting or tweeting and then being let go because the message was taken out of context or outright wrong. Now, more than […]

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3 Ways Leaders Generate Social Media Influence via CTR

 

Social media influence can make or break a leader and an entire organization. Too often, nightly news is bombarded with articles of leaders posting or tweeting and then being let go because the message was taken out of context or outright wrong. Now, more than ever, with everyone working from home due to pandemic protection, a leaders’ social media prowess either makes or breaks the virtual team. What social media message strategies should leaders use to ensure their messages and posts are as powerful, clear, and inspiring as possible?

 

Coincidentally, recent studies posit three main types of social media messaging: 1. Authoritative spokesperson, 2. Information dissemination, and 3. Initiative participatory messaging (Lee & Cho, 2017). Additionally, the same study found the ‘participatory initiative’ messages most effective for generating likes and shares (Lee & Cho, 2017). For this post, we will use creating likes and shares as our measure of influence, even though we can all agree that not all likes and shares are influential. I submit that to generate high numbers of likes and shares; leaders should follow the acronym CTR. For those of you with web backgrounds, CTR is basically, the number of clicks per specific link vs. the number of visits per page (Kim, 2020) which is fitting, based on this post’s purpose. To increase social media influence, leaders should create emotional, transformational, and brand resonant messages.

 

C – Create Emotion

 

Leaders should use emotional messages to create a connection with the clientele and followers. Emotional messages generate higher levels of public engagement than informational or authoritative messages (Yi, Zifei, Weiting, & Zongchao, 2019). While emotional content generates likes, it does not correlate to higher shares, even if the leader increases the emotional content (Yi, Zifei, Weiting, & Zongchao, 2019). Consequently, happy messages receive more than double the amount of shares than sad, or even angry messages (Yi, Zifei, Weiting, & Zongchao, 2019). With so much pain, suffering, anger, and sadness in the world, leaders have no reason to add to it, when they cane be inspiring. However, care must be taken to not make the message campy or forced.

 

T – Transformational

 

Greater yet, adding a transformational element to the message stimulates higher sharing rates (Wondwesen & Wien, 2018). Transformational messages associate positive customer experiences with desired psychological characteristics to create ongoing interaction (Wondwesen & Wien, 2018). A happy message will bring followers to you. To keep them or bring them back, the message must combine that feeling with a desired characteristic. How does what you are saying make the experience of following you, using your product, or working in your organization more exciting, warmer, and richer than otherwise?

 

R – Brand Resonant

 

Additionally, including brand heritage increases resonance, shares, and customer loyalty (Wondwesen & Wien, 2018). Always start with the principle that “truth builds trust’ and speak the truth. As you speak the truth, loyalty increases. However, leaders should be cautious to minimize the amount of cognitive load the messages contain to avoid stimulating the opposite effect (Yi, Zifei, Weiting, & Zongchao, 2019).

 

Social media influence can make or break a leader and an entire organization. To generate high numbers of likes and shares; leaders should follow the acronym CTR and create emotional, transformational, and brand resonant messages.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

For those of you searching for general life coaching, SHVA offers general Life Coaching now!

 

References

Kim, L. (2020). Click-Through Rate (CTR): Understanding Click-Through Rate for PPC.

Lee, M. J., & Cho, H. (2017). Uses of social media in government agencies: Content analyses of public relations strategies and message tactics comparison between South Korea and the United States of America in 2011 and 2014. Journal of Public Affairs, 1-8.

Wondwesen, T., & Wien, A. (2018). Using message strategy to drive consumer behavioral engagement on social media. The Journal of Consumer Marketing, 241-253.

Yi, G. J., Zifei, F. C., Weiting, T., & Zongchao, C. L. (2019). Functional and emotional traits of corporate social media message strategies: Behavioral insights from S&P 500 Facebook data. Public Relations Review, 88-103.

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Corporate Cyberbullies – 2 Ways to Defeat Them https://shvaleadership.com/2020/03/24/corporate-cyberbullies-2-ways-to-defeat-them/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/03/24/corporate-cyberbullies-2-ways-to-defeat-them/#comments Tue, 24 Mar 2020 02:11:33 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=8949 Corporate Cyberbullies – 2 Ways to Defeat Them   Corporate cyberbullies run rampant on social media. This post is based on a request from a coaching client as a follow up to my 3 Ways leaders Can Maximize Social Media post. I recall a news story a few years ago that highlighted this issue. The […]

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Corporate Cyberbullies – 2 Ways to Defeat Them

 

Corporate cyberbullies run rampant on social media. This post is based on a request from a coaching client as a follow up to my 3 Ways leaders Can Maximize Social Media post. I recall a news story a few years ago that highlighted this issue. The story outlined several instances corporations displayed bad behavior and social media initiated the reforms (David, 2014). However, social media reaction often falls prey to social justice warriors and scorned customers trying to cause the company harm (David, 2014). While leaders should use social media to actively listen to the client and employee base, I believe they should prepare for social media cyberbullies.

 

Assess Audience Shared Values

To mitigate damage done by corporate cyberbullies, leaders should assess the audience and address shared values. Much like George Washington addressing soldiers on the brink of mutiny after the Revolutionary War, leaders need enough social skills to determine the audience’s need and remind them of shared experiences and values (Baldoni, 2003, pgs. 98-99). In a speech after the War, Washington reacted to his corporate cyberbullies when he reminded the soldiers he too grew gray and blind in one eye in the War, thus breaking the tension (Baldoni, 2003, pgs. 98-99). Similarly, leaders should remind employees and followers of the shared difficulties they passed through in making it to the present. By doing this, tensions ease and make way for smoother relations. Too often, employees view the working environment as an “us versus them” gig. If leaders remind employees they, too suffer, the company makes forward progress.

 

Realize When to Act and Not Act

Leaders should realize while some situations require action, others require inaction. However, many corporate lawsuits originate from perceived leadership inaction  (Valentine, Fleischman, & Godkin, 2018). Valentine, Fleischman, & Godkin (2018) suggest lawsuits may be avoided by forming employee peer groups, conducting ethics training, and leadership psychopathy training (Valentine, Fleischman, & Godkin, 2018). Specifically, the training should focus on lowering anxiety and exhibiting low emotional reactivity (Nekrassovski, 2016). Consequently, the Bible teaches a “soft answer turneth away wrath” (Pro. 15:1, King James Version). I believe, by employing these tactics, leaders may be successful in the face of bullies.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

For those of you searching for general life coaching, SHVA offers general Life Coaching now!

 

References

Baldoni, J. (2003). Great Communication Secrets of Great Leaders. New York: McGraw-Hill.

David, J. E. (2014, April 30). Cyberbullying’s Got a New Target: Big Companies. Retrieved from nbcnews.com

Nekrassovski, O. (2016, August). Psychopathy and Leadership. Retrieved from researchgate.net

Valentine, S., Fleischman, G., & Godkin, L. (2018). Villains, Victims, and Verisimilitudes: An Exploratory Study of Unethical Corporate Values, Bullying Experiences, Psychopathy, and Selling Professionals’ Ethical Reasoning. Journal of Business Ethics, 135-154.

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Death of company loyalty: How to replace company loyalty with leader loyalty https://shvaleadership.com/2020/03/18/death-of-company-loyalty-how-to-replace-company-loyalty-with-leader-loyalty/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/03/18/death-of-company-loyalty-how-to-replace-company-loyalty-with-leader-loyalty/#respond Tue, 17 Mar 2020 21:41:28 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=8427 Death of company loyalty: How to replace company loyalty with leader loyalty   Company Loyalty is Dead   Company loyalty is dead. The days of employees working 20 years with one company are gone. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that adults work an average of 5 years with one company before moving on. The […]

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Death of company loyalty: How to replace company loyalty with leader loyalty

 

Company Loyalty is Dead

 

Company loyalty is dead. The days of employees working 20 years with one company are gone. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that adults work an average of 5 years with one company before moving on. The traditional style of top-down leadership is no longer feasible to motivate employees. Leaders cannot simply dictate orders and hope employees will remain with the company for the retirement package. With the advent of challenges such as virtual teams and a greater focus on diversity in the workplace, successful leaders must build stronger relationships with their followers.

Company loyalty emerged from the relationships employees built. Instead of company loyalty, followers commit themselves to specific leaders. Leaders who earn this loyalty will have the highest producing teams. Leadership study almost totally ignores the relationship followers have with leaders, focusing only on the leader’s style. But to have a genuine conversation about leadership, we must address both sides of the leader-follower relationship. Leaders must have certain traits for them to be truly effective when it comes to leading followers. This is even truer when factoring in the global business community and the vast array of cultures it brings to the table. Studies show that followers are more motivated to go “above and beyond” if they have a positive perception of the leader.

The perception of the leader is built, in part, by the relationship between the leader and the follower. Leaders must follow three fundamental principles to maximize the leader-follower relationship: competence, caring, and trust. So, let’s first look at the four types of leader-follower relationships. Then we will discuss three fundamental principles. And lastly, we will discuss how the leader supports the role the follower plays in cementing the relationship.

 

Relationships

 

Without a doubt, the leader-follower relationship is essential to success. The key deciding factor is the follower’s perception of the leader. Does he know what he is doing? Does he care about me? Does he trust me? In today’s social media world, perception is the reality. We see leaders and followers alike instantly condemned due to a perceived indiscretion. Many times, even after the situation is cleared up, social media does not forget. Leaders must work hard to build positive perception, and once attained, they must guard it through continued diligence.

Authority-based relationships

According to a study conducted in 2006, made up of 600 government employees on a Caribbean Island, there are four basic types of leader-follower relationships: Authority-based, Collaborative, Partnership, and Engaged. Authority-based relationships are by default of taking the job. A new employee gains a supervisor. These relationships tend to build enough strength to obtain the minimum amount of work to avoid termination. These relationships do not garner loyalty, nor do they motivate followers to go above and beyond. If you disagree, look at Darth Vader, the Dark Lord of the Sith from the Star Wars movie saga. None of his employees went above and beyond for him; they wanted to do enough to survive, literally! For these reasons, we will focus on the remaining three relationships.

Collaborative/Partnership relationship

In a collaborative relationship, the leader and follower work together to accomplish the organization’s goals. Leaders and followers enjoy open communication with each other. The leader must have high competence in the required work, and both leaders and followers must have mutual trust, respect, and loyalty. As respect and trust increases, partnership forms. In a partnership relationship, the follower perceives equality with the leader. The leader values the follower’s opinions and allows for more independence in completing tasks. Additionally, both followers and leaders openly acknowledge they need each other to succeed.

Engaged relationship

The highest form of relationship is the engaged relationship. In this relationship, followers share information with the leader regularly. Every person takes the initiative to correct and discuss issues, and everyone is highly committed. It is at this level that the leader provides clear-cut expectations, the followers contribute, and followers have opportunities for advancement and growth. So, what fundamental principles must a leader practice to reach the highest engaged relationship level? Leaders demonstrate competence, care for the follower, and implicit trust.

 

Competency

 

The first fundamental principle leaders must demonstrate to move the relationship to a higher level is competency. Competency can be defined as a combination of implicit and explicit knowledge, behavior, skills, and abilities. The leader must be authentic, they must be able to read and understand their follower’s emotions, and they must engage in the work with them. Studies have shown the competency of the leader directly impacts the engagement, performance, and effectiveness of the followers. A study conducted in 2016 by Tongji University in Shanghai, China, discovered there was a direct correlation between the leader’s perceived competence level and increased or decreased employee engagement. The study concluded that the leader’s authenticity improved the follower’s task performance and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), meaning they were excellent and cordial employees.

Demonstrating Competency

Followers perceive leaders with high emotional competence as trustworthy. Leaders who engaged in the work with followers saw an increase in follower’s production and OCB. This finding was universal across cultures. Even more noteworthy, the leader’s perceived competence in job procedures weighted more heavily in times of crisis or emergency. The employees gathered around the leaders with the highest perceived job competency when there was an emergency or when critical tasks were to be required. Followers must view leaders as emotionally and professionally competent to bring the group to the engaged participation level.

 

Caring

 

The second fundamental principle the leader must demonstrate to improve the leader-follower relationship is to care for the employee. Theodore Roosevelt pointed out, “Nobody cares how much you know until they know how much you care.” Caring is more than just an exhibition of emotional competence. Caring is giving personalized attention to followers. Additionally, the leader must be willing to go the extra mile for the followers, especially if the leader expects the same from them. This gives credence to Servant leadership and Transformational leadership theories.

Listen

Before employees become dedicated to the company cause, they first must be devoted to the leader. Another study revealed ten characteristics that a servant leader must have to show they care for the follower. I will discuss the five I see as most relevant to this conversation. First is the leader’s ability to listen. By listening, the leader can gain both professional and personal insights into the followers’ lives. This enables the leader to plan for future events, show greater empathy, and know how to better relate to each follower.

Compassion

Second is the leader’s ability to show compassion. Empathy shows followers that you understand and wish the best for them. More importantly, it helps the leader assume the best of each follower. The third is the leader’s ability to heal. The ability to heal wounds is essential. The most influential leaders can discover wounds and injuries and provide paths to healing, thus making each follower feel whole and complete. Fourth is the leader’s ability to be aware of personal weaknesses and work to strengthen them. As the leader admits shortcomings to followers, they see the leader as more “real” and human and trustworthy.

Worth

The fifth is the leader’s commitment to the follower’s growth. The leader recognizes the follower’s worth outside of the office. The leader fosters a workplace that encourages professional and personal growth by making funds available for higher education studies, professional development opportunities, and encouraging involvement in work decisions, to name a few. As the leader demonstrates these five characteristics, they will show not only that they care, but how much they care. Caring will move the employees closer to the engaged relationship we are seeking.

 

Trust

 

The last of the three fundamental principles that leaders must demonstrate to move the relationship to a higher level is trust. Previously, employees had trust in the company. That trust created company loyalty. Leaders must fill the void left by the company. Trust is even more critical in today’s virtual workplace. It is easier to build confidence in a face to face environment because we can see the emotions on the faces of those with whom we interact. In a virtual environment, this is not always the case.

Accessibility

To increase trust, leaders should avoid being inaccessible and distanced from their followers. Ann-Marie Nienaber, a researcher with Coventry University in the United Kingdom, defined trust as a willingness to be vulnerable to another’s actions with the expectation the other party will act in a mutually acceptable manner. The keyword here is vulnerable. They can demonstrate vulnerability in two ways. First, leaders show vulnerability by delegating and relying on the followers to complete assigned tasks. Second, leaders should show active, disclosure-based, vulnerability by sharing important personal and strategic information with their followers. By delegating and sharing personal and strategic information, leaders increase trust with followers.

Encourage Trust

For too long, leadership discussions have excluded the responsibility followers have and how leaders can support followers in cementing the leader-follower relationship. For the leader and follower to reach the engaged relationship, leaders must encourage and support specific behaviors and actions from the followers. Trust must go both ways. The followers must also gain the trust of the leader; otherwise, they will not reach the engaged relationship status. Leaders can encourage followers to build trust with the leader by being open to personal contact and by fulfilling assignments promptly. They should strive to help followers create an emotional connection with the leader by seeking regular individual meetings with the leader. Both parties must be engaged in trust-building for the process to work and trust increase.

Goal Setting

Followers must be encouraged to take a more active role in achieving the common goals they and the leader have. In taking those more active roles, they support the leader in reaching the goals. Followers must be allowed to be courageous and constructively challenge the leader if threats arise to the common goals or team integrity. They must also be encouraged to champion change to improve a process, more quickly move the group towards its goals, or to avoid the risk of potential harm. Finally, followers must be allowed to take moral stands to prevent abuses of ethics and laws. In a nutshell, followers must get the job done, and leaders must allow them the chance to do so. As the followers work to increase trust with the leader, the relationship will progress through the tiers at an ever-faster pace, and both the leader and follower will reap the personal and professional rewards.

 

Leader Loyalty is Alive

 

In today’s global business environment, leaders must focus on the impact their leadership has on followers. With the advent of virtual teams and a greater focus on diversity in the workplace, leaders need to follow specific principles to enable them to manage the leader-follower relationship and maximize the returns on that relationship. For too long, leadership study almost totally ignored the relationship followers have with leaders. But to have a genuine conversation about leadership, we must address both sides of the leader-follower relationship.

Because company loyalty is dead, leaders must elicit loyalty from the followers. In this conversation, we explored the value of the three types of leader-follower relationships. We discussed three critical principles the leader must have to move the relationship to higher levels of positive perception. And lastly, we discussed how the leader supports the role the follower plays in cementing the relationship. As the leader strives to be competent in the workplace, care for the employee, and work with the follower to build trust, the leader-follower relationship will strengthen until it reaches the engaged relationship stage.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

For those of you searching for general life coaching, SHVA offers general Life Coaching now!

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3 Ways Leaders Can Maximize Social Media https://shvaleadership.com/2020/03/10/3-ways-leaders-can-maximize-social-media/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/03/10/3-ways-leaders-can-maximize-social-media/#comments Tue, 10 Mar 2020 17:38:05 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=7892 3 Ways Leaders Can Maximize Social Media   Leaders can maximize social media’s impact on their organization. Social media is the modern equivalent of the town square. Additionally, the town square is also called the public square. Historically, towns built large areas, in the shape of a square, where the public could gather to listen […]

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3 Ways Leaders Can Maximize Social Media

 

Leaders can maximize social media’s impact on their organization. Social media is the modern equivalent of the town square. Additionally, the town square is also called the public square. Historically, towns built large areas, in the shape of a square, where the public could gather to listen to leaders and voice opinions on public matters (merriam-webster.com, 2020). However, a physical town square has limits on the number of listeners it may accommodate and the distance with which the leader’s voice may travel. Consequently, these limitations do not pertain to social media. To maximize effectiveness, leaders should be social media savvy (Moorley & Chinn, 2015). Specifically, leaders should use social media to communicate guidance and calm in crises, listen to followers on a micro-scale, and inspire innovation.

Maximize Social Media During a Crisis

Leaders should maximize social media to communicate in a time of crisis. Straightforwardly, demonstrating high competence inspires loyalty and trust (Johnson & Hackman, 2018, pg. 467). During an emergency, loyalty and trust are essential for survival and execution of possible life-saving actions. Specifically, the life saved is that of the organization. Interestingly, the use of social media in crises has been shown to positively influence employee perceptions in certain situations (Jiang, Luo, & Kulemeka, 2017). Additionally, leaders may use social media to communicate direction, actions, and resilient assurance to followers, especially if a physical meeting is impossible.

Listen to Followers on a Micro-Scale and Inspire Innovation

Leaders should maximize social media to listen to followers on a micro-scale and inspire innovation. In addition to increasing the number of people impacted, social media allows leaders to address individual user’s concerns and comments, in near real-time (Moorley & Chinn, 2015). Because leaders can address concerns and share knowledge instantly with followers, conversations spark innovation, which hastens problem-solving (Abbas Khan & Nawaz Khan, 2019). Social media may benefit leaders if appropriately used, like the town square of old.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

For those of you searching for general life coaching, SHVA offers general Life Coaching now!

 

References

Abbas Khan, N., & Nawaz Khan, A. (2019). What followers are saying about transformational leaders fostering employee innovation via organisational learning, knowledge sharing and social media use in public organisations? Government Information Quarterly.

Jiang, H., Luo, Y., & Kulemeka, O. (2017). Strategic Social Media Use in Public Relations: Professionals’ Perceived Social Media Impact, Leadership Behaviors, and Work-Life Conflict. International Journal of Strategic Communication, 18-41.

Johnson, C. E., & Hackman, M. Z. (2018). Leadership A Communication Perspective. Long Grove: Waveland Press, Inc.

merriam-webster.com. (2020, February 25). Public Square. Retrieved from merriam-webster.com

Moorley, C. P., & Chinn, T. M. (2015). Developing nursing leadership in social media. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 514–520.

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The 4 Steps to Delegating are a Piece of CAKE https://shvaleadership.com/2020/02/26/the-4-steps-to-delegating-are-a-piece-of-cake/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/02/26/the-4-steps-to-delegating-are-a-piece-of-cake/#comments Tue, 25 Feb 2020 23:06:46 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=6938 The 4 Steps to Delegating are a Piece of CAKE   Delegating is a tough task. Delegating can be very frustrating, especially when I can do it myself faster, and the job will come out just the way I like. However, delegating is a critical skill that can make or break a leader and an […]

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The 4 Steps to Delegating are a Piece of CAKE

 

Delegating is a tough task. Delegating can be very frustrating, especially when I can do it myself faster, and the job will come out just the way I like. However, delegating is a critical skill that can make or break a leader and an organization. More importantly, a study in the Academy of Management Journal demonstrated that less delegating causes slower promotion and career growth. As leaders, we can and should do better at delegating.

Leaders must learn how to delegate effectively. Too many times, information on delegating gets cumbersome with too many steps. Consequently, the process must be more straightforward. A study in the Psychological Science journal revealed that efficient learners use strategies, such as chunking, keyword linking, and sequencing. With this in mind, let’s break down delegating to a four-step process and keyword link it to CAKE.

Practical delating consists of four steps using the acronym CAKE.

C – Can I delegate this task to someone else?

A – Assign the task.

K – Know-how. Does the person have the know-how to complete the task?

E – Entrust the task to the person.

C – Can I Delegate?

The first step is deciding if you may assign the task. Leaders should ask a few questions to ascertain if the job qualifies for delegation.

Am I required by law to perform this task?

Am I required by organizational policy to perform this task?

Will this task help professionally develop another employee?

If you are required to perform the task (by law, for example), you should not delegate the responsibility. However, if you determine another person could perform the job, then you move to the next step in the process, assigning the task.

A – Assign the Task

Delegating is much like hiring. You must hire the right person. Similarly, you must assign the job to the right person. Interestingly, a study in the Career Development International journal revealed that to assign the task, the leader must trust the follower, and the follower must trust the leader. Follow these general rules when determining the right person for the job:

Assign tasks to the employee that will professionally develop the most from its completion. If they are all equal, then:

  • Assign sizable projects or tasks to your most confident employees.
  • Assign different and unique tasks to your most tenured employees.
  • Assign time-sensitive or crucial tasks to your most organized employees.

K – Know-how: Does the Person Have the Know-how?

Next, you need to determine if that person has the know-how to complete the job. Consequently, making this determination may be as simple as asking the employee. Other times, asking may not be practical, especially if the situation is more sensitive. Use the following questions when considering the employee’s know-how:

Does the employee have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to complete the assignment?

If not, do I have the time, means, and ability to train the employee? Even though it is not directly linked, a study in the Journal of Educational Research showed task-based instruction was more effective versus traditional instruction for middle-school language learners. Therefore, by keeping the guidance task-based, your odds of retention increase.

When determining know-how, it is vital that if the employee lacks knowledge and you cannot provide that missing knowledge, it would be best to revisit the assigning step in the process.

E – Entrust them to Complete the Delegated Task

Perhaps the most critical step in delegating is entrusting the work to the employee and allowing them to succeed. Followers trust that leaders will act in their best interest and afford the leader a measure of vulnerability. To ensure task completion, leaders should extend a measure of vulnerability to the follower. To build greater trust, a study in the Personnel Review journal revealed that leaders must explain to the employee the importance of the responsibility and vulnerability you have for job completion. For larger tasks, it may be helpful to break it down to smaller sub-tasks and conduct mini-meetings at various intervals to monitor progress and resolve concerns. Much like goal setting, smaller sub-tasks can inspire greater motivation through a sense of attainability.

Conclusion

Delegating can be very frustrating. However, it is a critical skill that can make or break a leader and an organization. As leaders, we can do a better job of delegating. Therefore, the delegation process should not be complicated. Leaders may more effectively delegate by remembering that the four steps of delegating are a piece of CAKE.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

For those of you searching for general life coaching, SHVA offers general Life Coaching now!

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3 Communication Practices to Escape Productivity TAR https://shvaleadership.com/2020/02/17/3-communication-practices-to-escape-productivity-tar/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/02/17/3-communication-practices-to-escape-productivity-tar/#comments Mon, 17 Feb 2020 17:22:27 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=6482 3 Communication Practices to Escape Productivity TAR To avoid extinction like the dinosaurs, leaders must ensure productivity does not get stuck. Just like the dinosaurs of old, we too must avoid being stuck in modern tar-pits. To avoid getting your organization’s productivity stuck, leaders need to alter their communication practices.   Leaders need the soft […]

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3 Communication Practices to Escape Productivity TAR

To avoid extinction like the dinosaurs, leaders must ensure productivity does not get stuck. Just like the dinosaurs of old, we too must avoid being stuck in modern tar-pits. To avoid getting your organization’s productivity stuck, leaders need to alter their communication practices.

 

Leaders need the soft skill of communication. Unclear or confusing communication causes frustration, both in the employee and the leader, increased aggression, reduced loyalty, and decreased productivity and work attendance. Similarly, researchers note that these are the same behaviors that populations tend to have before a political revolution. With better communication practices, organizations will realize increased leader loyalty, employee engagement, and higher productivity.

 

Specifically, leaders should engage in three distinct communication practices to not only avoid productivity tar but to yank their productivity out if it is already stuck. Therefore, to better remember the three practices, let’s tie them to the thing we want most to be away from, TAR.

 

T – Communicate a Clear Target

A – Communicate Accountability

R – Receive Rebuttals

 

Target

To be productive, we need a target. Targets help us focus. While goal setting is a great start, communicating a clear and specific target encourages us the opportunity to hone our skills to hit the bullseye.

 

Unclear or vague corporate missions, like “Help bring about world peace,” are insufficient for employee and company growth. Consequently, leaders should help align the employee’s goals with those of the organization. Performance Coaching teaches leaders the most basic, yet often underused communication practices, asking questions and listening for answers. Coaching helps re-frame those personal goals as targets with clearly communicated milestones.

 

By asking questions, the coaching leader builds trust and learns the employee’s goals. After communicating the organizational goals, the leader can tie organizational expectations to individual goals and communicate a clear target to the employee. To start, you may want to ask some of the following questions:

 

  • What is your purpose for being here?
  • How does your purpose align with the organizations’ mission and goals?
  • What can I do to help you reach your purpose?

Accountability

Without accountability, there is no responsibility. Many think the leader holds the follower accountable by the threat of termination. Sadly, this type of leadership only encourages the employee to do just enough work to avoid termination and sinks us further into productivity TAR.

 

To illustrate, in the popular Star Wars movie saga, we see none of Darth Vader’s employees achieve more than the minimum for fear of getting terminated! In contrast, the Jedi Master, Yoda, instilled personal accountability by communicating the simple phrase, “Do or do not. There is no try.” External accountability is not enough to get out of the tar.

 

Accountability must come from inside the individual. Therefore, leaders must engender a culture of individual internal accountability. The leader must ensure they have clearly communicated whose responsibility it is to track accountability by asking pointed questions that determine the importance of reaching the target and the metrics the employee will use to reach the target. If the leader does not communicate clear accountability, the employee is left to assume they hold no responsibility for the outcome. Once the leader has communicated to the employee, they are accountable to themselves. However, the leader may assist the employee in measuring that accountability through metrics.

 

Again, we can turn to some Performance Coaching powerful questions to encourage personal accountability. After you have defined the target using the earlier questions, follow up with some of the questions below:

 

  • How important to you is reaching your purpose/goal/target?
  • How will reaching this impact your life and job?
  • How will you know when you have reached your purpose?
  • What are your metrics for success?

Rebuttal

The leader-follower dialogue must have balance. Employees see what is happening and are in a unique position to provide course-correcting feedback to leaders. Employees must be allowed to disagree with leadership to keep the organization on track for meeting its goals. By receiving rebuttals communicated from the employee, leaders promote open and honest dialogue, which sets the organization up for success.

 

To foster communication balance, the leader must allow communication reciprocity. Additionally, followers must stand up for what is right, no matter the cost. This is especially true if the follower notices the leader putting the team on a disastrous course.

 

Receiving rebuttals is more than just listening. The leader should actively listen to the rebuttal and ask pointed questions to understand the implications and projected outcomes fully. Consequently, this communication practice empowers employees to locate items for improvement and inspires them to do better quality work.

 

Conclusion

There is no downside to using these communication practices. Specifically, they foster individual employee growth, leader growth, promote creative thinking, and boost productivity because the employee is working for what they want. By using these three communication practices, communicating a clear target, communicating accountability, and receiving rebuttals, you can escape productivity tar.

 

Due to popular request, this article became the first in our new series on Productivity Improvement. Our second article is here.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

For those of you searching for general life coaching, SHVA offers general Life Coaching now!

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Organizational Culture and Leadership https://shvaleadership.com/2020/01/14/organizational-culture-and-leadership/ https://shvaleadership.com/2020/01/14/organizational-culture-and-leadership/#comments Mon, 13 Jan 2020 19:52:02 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=4834 Organizational Culture and Leadership 5th Ed Readability: Medium Compatible with Efficient Reading Course: Yes Applicability: Organizational Culture and Leadership describes how to help leaders and managers understand the current organizational culture and make desired changes. Specifically, the book provides an overview of the major organizational culture theories and provides pros and cons of each. The […]

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Organizational Culture and Leadership 5th Ed

Readability:

Medium

Compatible with Efficient Reading Course:

Yes

Applicability:

Organizational Culture and Leadership describes how to help leaders and managers understand the current organizational culture and make desired changes. Specifically, the book provides an overview of the major organizational culture theories and provides pros and cons of each. The book provides many examples of successful and unsuccessful corporate culture change projects. Additionally, there are two additional chapters in the fifth edition analyzing the difficulties of stable culture analysis and the national macro-culture implications.

The book provides powerful analytical insights into each of the major culture theories. As one of the first books on organizational culture, this book sets the standard of excellence for all to come. This book helps leaders manage cultural change by explaining what culture is, how it begins, thrives, and dies with poor leadership. Additionally, an in-depth study reveals the leadership styles needed to manage successful culture change. As leaders learn to initiate change through their leadership style, change is faster, easier, and long-lasting.

The book is well-written, sometimes easy to follow, and often delves into the psyche of fear as it relates to change. Interestingly, the book outlines the stages of fear and provides steps leaders should take to alleviate employees change fears. By combining leadership styles with current organizational change theory, leaders can make smooth change transitions.

Verdict:

Buy

To purchase the book from Amazon, click the picture below.

Book details: ISBN – 978-1-119-21204-1; pages – 384; publisher – John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; published – 2017

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

For those of you searching for general life coaching, SHVA offers general Life Coaching now!

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Biblically-based Leadership Principles https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/31/biblically-based-leadership-principles/ https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/31/biblically-based-leadership-principles/#comments Tue, 31 Dec 2019 14:59:57 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=4079 Biblically-based Leadership Principles Biblically-based leadership can be distilled down into five principles. These principles, all except for one, are taught in nearly every leadership course I ever attended or taught. However, I realize that the inclusion of biblically-based leadership principles has been and will forever polarize the general public. Nevertheless, we here at SHVA Leadership […]

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Biblically-based Leadership Principles

Biblically-based leadership can be distilled down into five principles. These principles, all except for one, are taught in nearly every leadership course I ever attended or taught. However, I realize that the inclusion of biblically-based leadership principles has been and will forever polarize the general public. Nevertheless, we here at SHVA Leadership Advisers build great leaders. We will take great leadership principles from nearly all sources. We believe that great leaders must seek to learn from the best books. Therefore, with almost 168,000 copies sold each day (Gaille, 2017), the Bible is a great book. There is no denying its selling power and global impact. Additionally, we will draw from Blanchard and Hodges, Lead Like Jesus, another great biblically-based leadership principle book.

 

The five biblically-based leadership principles I found most impactful were: Humility, Servant Leadership, Devotion to supporters/followers, Divine Submission, and Vision. As stated previously, we believe all leadership principles should be distilled down into these core principles. In today’s global business environment, leaders are bombarded with ever-increasing complex leadership theories and style suggestions. However, at SHVA Leadership Advisers, we subscribe to the belief that leadership must be simple to be truly useful. If the leader is too worried about the process or the steps, the leader is not leading but managing. So, let’s review the five core biblically-based leadership principles, that if practiced, will drive you and your followers to exceptional performance.

 

Humility

Scripture teaches us that God will bless and give wisdom to the humble (Proverbs 11:2, KJV). Additionally, Jesus taught that the person that would be the greatest must be the servant (Mark 10:43-44, KJV).  One of the main reasons that humility is so vital in biblically-based leadership is because, as we are humble, we are teachable and God can teach us to serve those we lead (Blanchard and Hodges, 2008, p. 32). Humility allows us to learn, grow, and seek advice from multiple sources to determine the best possible course of action.

 

Servant Leadership

Through servant leadership, we show others that we are accountable to a higher power, namely God. Additionally, we remember that our authority is on loan to us from those we lead (Burkhart, 2015). At some point, our leadership authority will end. Your leadership may end through a job change, promotion, demotion, firing, or hiring.

 

Nevertheless, the one constant is your authority is temporary. Leaders must make the most significant impact in the time allotted to them by the followers. Serving them enables them to grow and encourages them to mimic your exceptional leadership style.

 

Devotion to Supporters/Followers

Jesus taught his followers to love others as they loved themselves (Mark 12:31, KJV). For success, the leader must be devoted to the well-being and welfare of those he/she serves and to those that support/follow him. In today’s market, employees are not loyal to companies any longer. Instead, they are loyal to individual leaders, following them from company to company. As you show devotion to them by getting to know them and providing opportunities for professional development, devotion increases on both sides.

 

Divine Submission

This biblically-based leadership principle will be the most controversial. This one is close to humility to God but is more than that. As a leader, you must do as Jesus did and submit entirely to the divine will of God (Mark 10:45, KJV). As the submission is complete, the vision and grand design of God will be more transparent and enable the leader to serve more effectively, as the leader sees each person as divine progeny (Blanchard and Hodges, 2008, p.68). Once the leader acknowledges he is not all-knowing and all-powerful, he can see his followers as equals, not subservient. Equality engenders humility, servant leadership, and devotion.

 

Vision

All great leaders had a grand vision of the world they hoped to create through their leadership. Jesus was clear as to the vision for his mission (Mark 4:19, KJV). The leader must have a clear vision that “should express a higher purpose” (Blanchard and Hodges, 2008, p.85) than the typical business mission statements. A bright and high vision will inspire employees and followers to work for greater heights. If the vision is not clear, the mission will fail (Blanchard and Hodges, 2008, p.87).

 

In conclusion, by learning and integrating these five biblically-based leadership principles, your leadership will reach unlimited heights and guide you and your followers to greatness.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

 

References

Blanchard, K., & Hodges, P. (2008). Lead Like Jesus – Revisited. Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

Burkhart, A. (2015, January 23). A Biblical Mandate for Servant Leadership. Retrieved from The Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics.

Gaille, B. (2017, May 23). 29 Good Bible Sales Statistics. Retrieved from brandongaille.com.

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Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture – Based on the Competing Values Framework 3rd Ed https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/27/diagnosing-and-changing-organizational-culture-based-on-the-competing-values-framework-3rd-ed/ https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/27/diagnosing-and-changing-organizational-culture-based-on-the-competing-values-framework-3rd-ed/#comments Fri, 27 Dec 2019 16:22:25 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=3779 Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture – Based on the Competing Values Framework 3rd Ed Readability: Medium Compatible with Efficient Reading Course: Yes Applicability: Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture describes how to help consultants and organizational change managers understand the culture and make desired changes. Specifically, the book provides instructions for using the Organizational Cultural Assessment […]

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Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture – Based on the Competing Values Framework 3rd Ed

Readability:

Medium

Compatible with Efficient Reading Course:

Yes

Applicability:

Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture describes how to help consultants and organizational change managers understand the culture and make desired changes. Specifically, the book provides instructions for using the Organizational Cultural Assessment Instrument (OCAI). Additionally, it provides an explanation of theoretical culture framework and an easy to follow strategy to implement desired cultural changes.

The book provides powerful tools and instruments to help coaches, supervisors, and managers plan a path forward after conducting diagnostic assessments. Precisely, leaders evaluate the culture by using the OCAI, a Management Competency Assessment, and employee interviews. Once diagnosed, the book provides a nine-step process for implementing the desired cultural changes. Lastly, the book focuses on implementing cultural differences on a personal level. No organizational culture change process will succeed without first changing individual behaviors. Accordingly, the book provides several ways managers and leaders can work to institute organizational culture change on the individual level of all employees.

The book is well-written, easy to follow, yet challenging to read at times. Additionally, the assessments are simple to administer and powerful in scope. However, the book provides instructions for leaders to assess the cultural climate using paper, pencil and drafting tools. These skills are not needed and a waste of time, as all the assessments in the book are available online for free or for a small fee. All in all, the book distills down the importance of organizational culture and provides assessments to diagnose and change any organization’s culture for the better.

Verdict:

Buy

To purchase the book from Amazon, click the picture below.

Book details: ISBN – 0-470-65026-4; pages – 251; publisher – Josey-Bass/Pfeiffer; published – 2011

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

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Constructive Disagreement https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/21/constructive-disagreement/ https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/21/constructive-disagreement/#comments Sat, 21 Dec 2019 17:56:57 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=3312 Constructive Disagreement Constructive disagreement is essential. However, sometimes followers must disagree with leaders. Accordingly, many political revolutions started because of follower disagreements (Gebil, 1990). In today’s global economy, it is crucial that followers constructively disagree, occasionally, with the leaders, to ensure the business stays on track. Therefore, to maintain a constant flow of reciprocity in […]

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Constructive Disagreement

Constructive disagreement is essential. However, sometimes followers must disagree with leaders. Accordingly, many political revolutions started because of follower disagreements (Gebil, 1990). In today’s global economy, it is crucial that followers constructively disagree, occasionally, with the leaders, to ensure the business stays on track. Therefore, to maintain a constant flow of reciprocity in the leader-follower exchange (LMX), managers and leaders must have a balanced dialogue with followers (Loignon, Gooty, Rogelberg, & Lucianetti, 2019). Additionally, followers must challenge the leader (constructively) if common goals or team integrity is compromised (Northouse, 2019, pg. 299). Furthermore, great examples are found in learning about guide dogs that disobeyed to save the owner’s lives. In situations like these, the follower must be prepared to stand up for the right no matter the personal cost (Chaleff, 2015, pg. 60).

 

Biblical Example

A great Biblical example of constructive disagreement was the Apostle Paul and Peter disagreeing over the continuation of circumcision. Before the Jerusalem conference, Peter taught the requirement of circumcision as part of the entrance into the Church (Galatians 2:3-8, King James Version). Later, at a meeting in Jerusalem, Paul confronted Peter and “withstood him to the face” (Galatians 2:11) in defense of ending the circumcision requirement. Additionally, Paul charged Peter with hypocrisy because Peter lived as the Gentiles, but required the Gentiles to live as the Jews (Galatians 2:14).

After much prayer and healthy debate, the apostles acknowledged Christ superseded the Law of Moses (Acts 15:20-22). Subsequently, they ended the practice by apostolic decree (Acts 15:22-29), thus opening the door for Christianity to more easily spread among the Gentiles. In addition, it is important to note that this disagreement was not a challenge of authority and Peter did not lose any power by agreeing with Paul. In light of this example, followers must disagree with leaders when issues of moral importance are at hand.

 

How to Foster Constructive Disagreement Culture in Your Organization

Leaders must foster a culture where disagreement is not only allowed but encouraged. Fostering this culture is critical if we want independent thinking and responsible citizenship. So, how can we foster a culture of intelligent disagreement?

 

  1. We can encourage questions about how and why we do things. We can do this by asking questions such as, “Why do you think I am asking you to do this?” and “What is another way we could do this?”
  2. Learn stories about trained guide dogs. You may even invite guide dog trainers to your office to demonstrate this ability. These demonstrations can be powerful and memorable learning situations.
  3. Demonstrate proper posture and voice tone for constructive disagreements, emphasizing using fewer emotions and more logic. – Reminding those you are instructing they are always responsible for the choices they make and the outcomes of those choices.

 

In conclusion, leaders must recognize the importance of constructive disagreement. History is full of stories where disagreement brought about significant change. Leaders must foster a culture where employees are encouraged to voice questions and constructively disagree, to ensure the business stays on track and continually improves.

 

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

 

References

Chaleff, I. (2015). Intelligent Disobedience. New York: MJF Books.

Gebil, A. (1990). Causes of Political Revolution. Charleston: Eastern Illinois University.

Loignon, A. C., Gooty, J., Rogelberg, S. G., & Lucianetti, L. (2019). Disagreement in leader–follower dyadic exchanges: Shared relationship satisfaction and investment as antecedents. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 618–644.

Northouse, P. G. (2019). Leadership: Theory and Practice (8 ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

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Balancing Individual and Organizational Values: Walking the Tightrope to Success https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/18/balancing-individual-and-organizational-values-walking-the-tightrope-to-success/ https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/18/balancing-individual-and-organizational-values-walking-the-tightrope-to-success/#respond Wed, 18 Dec 2019 04:09:14 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=3178 Balancing Individual and Organizational Values: Walking the Tightrope to Success Readability: Easy Compatible with Efficient Reading Course: Yes Applicability: Balancing Individual and Organizational Values, while written specifically for Organizational Development (OD) professionals, many of the aspects addressed in the book can be directly applied to coaching. Notably, Balancing Individual and Organizational Values describe how to […]

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Balancing Individual and Organizational Values: Walking the Tightrope to Success

Readability:

Easy

Compatible with Efficient Reading Course:

Yes

Applicability:

Balancing Individual and Organizational Values, while written specifically for Organizational Development (OD) professionals, many of the aspects addressed in the book can be directly applied to coaching. Notably, Balancing Individual and Organizational Values describe how to meet the needs of employees and organizations by serving the mutual interests of both. Specifically, values are the key to balancing. Individual values are the driving force of human motivation and are essential to long-term personal and business success. Therefore, walking the tightrope by establishing balance is critical skill managers and supervisors in the new worldwide economy.

The book provides powerful tools and instruments to help coaches, supervisors, and managers assess individual values and organizational values. Consequently, once evaluated, leaders can find balance and encourage personal mastery and increased productivity. Ultimately, a major theme of the book is one-on-one coaching is the most powerful and fast way to move your team or employees to greater organizational success by leveraging the power of individual values.

The book is well-written, easy to follow. The assessments are simple to administer and powerful in scope. All in all, the book distills down the importance of values and provides assessments to leverage their power in the workplace.

Verdict:

Buy

To purchase the book from Amazon, click the picture below.

Book details: ISBN – 0-7879-5720-8; pages – 241; publisher – Josey-Bass/Pfeiffer; published – 2002

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

For curiosity regarding the Efficient Reading Course, go to SHVA’s Career Coaching page to learn more and register for the class!

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

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Ethical Leadership https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/04/ethical-leadership/ https://shvaleadership.com/2019/12/04/ethical-leadership/#comments Wed, 04 Dec 2019 05:11:50 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=2500 Ethical Leadership Required in Today’s Global Marketplace Ethical leadership is required in today’s global business environment. Northouse (2019) discussed the growing interest in leadership ethics. This interest is due to the ever-increasing number of leader scandals in the private sector, public sector, and academia (Northouse, 2019, p. 335). Consequently, journal editorial essays support this position. […]

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Ethical Leadership Required in Today’s Global Marketplace

Ethical leadership is required in today’s global business environment. Northouse (2019) discussed the growing interest in leadership ethics. This interest is due to the ever-increasing number of leader scandals in the private sector, public sector, and academia (Northouse, 2019, p. 335). Consequently, journal editorial essays support this position. I would like to acknowledge the growing number of journal articles devoted to the study of the effects of unethical leaders on followers (Kalshoven & Taylor, 2018, p. 2). Therefore, ethics should play a major part in your leadership training curriculum.

Interestingly, Biblical scholars will note that “when the wicked beareth rule, the people mourn” (Proverbs 29:2, King James Version). A recent study supported this Biblical warning. For instance, it revealed leaders with “bottom-line” mentality (meaning they only cared about the business bottom-line) caused their employees with weaker moral identity to mimic their unethical behavior (Mesdaghinia, Rawat, & Nadavulakere, 2018, p. 9). Conversely, in similar situations, employees with higher moral identity exhibited higher turnover intention and decreased job satisfaction (Mesdaghinia, Rawat, & Nadavulakere, 2018, p. 11). Basically, the employees that held higher ethical standards became disgruntled and quit. In conclusion, to avoid high turnover, your leaders, supervisors, and managers, must act ethically.

Ethical leadership is a premier cornerstone of SHVA Leadership Adviser’s leadership development courses and coaching. If your organization has an ethics problem, contact us. We are ready to help!

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

Additionally, to learn more about leadership, career enhancement, or coaching, SHVA’s Articles page has what you need.

 

References

Kalshoven, K., & Taylor, S. (2018). Leadership: Philosophical Perspectives and Qualitative Analysis of Ethics—Looking Back, Looking Forward, Looking Around. Journal of Business Ethics, 1-3.

Mesdaghinia, S., Rawat, A., & Nadavulakere, S. (2018). Why Moral Followers Quit: Examining the Role of Leader Bottom-Line Mentality and Unethical Pro-Leader Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics, 1-15.

Northouse, P. G. (2019). Leadership: Theory and Practice (8 ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Photo by:
Nathan Dumlao

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1501 Ways to Reward Employees https://shvaleadership.com/2019/11/30/1501-ways-to-reward-employees/ https://shvaleadership.com/2019/11/30/1501-ways-to-reward-employees/#respond Sat, 30 Nov 2019 01:32:02 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=2083 1501 Ways to Reward Employees Readability: Mildly tricky to read Compatible with Efficient Reading Course: No Applicability: 1501 Ways to Reward Employees is a great resource for low-to-no-cost day-to-day ways to reward employees. The books consisted of two parts. Part 1 covers the reasoning behind and explains the need for employee recognition. He makes a […]

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1501 Ways to Reward Employees

Readability:

Mildly tricky to read

Compatible with Efficient Reading Course:

No

Applicability:

1501 Ways to Reward Employees is a great resource for low-to-no-cost day-to-day ways to reward employees. The books consisted of two parts. Part 1 covers the reasoning behind and explains the need for employee recognition. He makes a case for employee recognition by stating you must first get to know your employees. The central premise of the book is to provide personalized recognitions tailored to the person. A one-size-fits-all approach is discouraged. The author convincingly, and with data, shows that modern employees are not merely looking for a bonus or even working for money. More and more, employees seek meaningful employment and loyalty to a person instead of corporate commitment. With that premise, part two of the book discusses Day-to-Day recognitions and larger recognitions, like employee of the quarter awards.

The book provides hundreds of low-to-no cost ways to reward employees. Among our favorites are saying thank you during a team meeting and sending a thank you email and CCing the entire team. However, using those recognition pieces first, without first getting to know the team members, can be disastrous. While there are many people that long for outward praise and recognition, some do not.

Through it all, the central theme is getting to know your employees. Once you know them, then you can use the ideas in the book to deliver meaningful recognition. This book is a must-have for any leader.

Verdict:

Buy

To purchase the book from Amazon, click the picture below.

Book details: ISBN – 978-0-7611-6878-2; pages – 580; publisher – Workman Publishing Company, Inc.; published – 2012

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

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The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations – 6th ed https://shvaleadership.com/2019/10/23/1050/ https://shvaleadership.com/2019/10/23/1050/#comments Wed, 23 Oct 2019 02:05:23 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=1050 The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations – 6th ed Readability: Easy to read Compatible with Efficient Reading Course: Yes Applicability: The authors discuss five practices leaders should engage in to be an exemplary leader. The leadership challenge practices are simple to understand, yet powerful in application. The book is well-written and […]

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The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations – 6th ed

Readability:

Easy to read

Compatible with Efficient Reading Course:

Yes

Applicability:

The authors discuss five practices leaders should engage in to be an exemplary leader. The leadership challenge practices are simple to understand, yet powerful in application. The book is well-written and clear to understand. At times, as in many leadership books, the information tends to feel overwhelming. However, the authors do a great job of distilling the information to make it doable.

Each of the five practices listed in the Leadership Challenge have several sub-items the leader should take to reach the ultimate method. The book lays out each of the five steps and ten sub-steps with ease. This book is excellent for a new leader, or a leader that desires to gain a few more tools in the toolkit to make their leadership better.

Verdict:

Buy

Click on the picture to order your copy!

Book details: ISBN – 978-1-119-27896-2; pages – 313; publisher – John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; published – 2017

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

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The Making of a Christian Leader: How to Develop Management and Human Relations Skills https://shvaleadership.com/2019/10/05/the-making-of-a-christian-leader-how-to-develop-management-and-human-relations-skills/ https://shvaleadership.com/2019/10/05/the-making-of-a-christian-leader-how-to-develop-management-and-human-relations-skills/#comments Sat, 05 Oct 2019 19:24:27 +0000 https://shvaleadership.com/?p=835 The Making of a Christian Leader: How to Develop Management and Human Relations Skills Readability: Easy, quick Compatible with Efficient Reading Course: No Applicability: Ted Engstrom does a great job explaining the basics of leadership and supervision while adding a Christian perspective. The text makes a logical progression through essential leadership, beginning with an Old […]

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The Making of a Christian Leader: How to Develop Management and Human Relations Skills

Readability:

Easy, quick

Compatible with Efficient Reading Course:

No

Applicability:

Ted Engstrom does a great job explaining the basics of leadership and supervision while adding a Christian perspective. The text makes a logical progression through essential leadership, beginning with an Old Testament perspective moving through the New Testament and secular leadership theory.

The book does not subscribe to one leadership theory but addresses leadership as a whole. Each chapter is filled with so many practical applications of good leadership that, at times may cause the leadership student to feel overwhelmed.

The book contains an excellent chapter that covers the price Christian leaders must pay to be effective. While the section does have a sense of depression, due to the sheer volume of sacrifices leaders must make, it ends on a positive note directing the aspiring leader to exercise faith in God to accomplish the tasks.

Overall, this book was an easy read that, at times, felt overwhelming due to the sheer volume of tasks and actions leaders must take. The text was full of introductory-level leadership information, which at times delved into the intermediate range.

Verdict:

Buy

To purchase the book from Amazon, click the picture below.

Book details: ISBN – 978-0310242215; reading pages – 2018; publisher – Zondervan; published – 1976

You can better face your Leadership Challenge by joining SHVA’s leadership development engagements.

If you are looking to improve your job or find a new one, SHVA’s Career Coaching can help!

If you are looking for confidential executive coaching, SHVA’s Executive Coaching can help!

The post The Making of a Christian Leader: How to Develop Management and Human Relations Skills appeared first on SHVA.

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